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    new_new Fsc 2nd Year chapter No :1 | ELECTROSTATICS

    Fsc 2nd Year chapter No :1 | ELECTROSTATICS

    Topic No :7


    GAUSS'S LAW

    The total of the electric flux out of a closed surface is equal to the charge enclosed divided by the permittivity.
    gaulaw - Fsc 2nd Year chapter No :1 | ELECTROSTATICS The electric flux through an area is defined as the electric field multiplied by the area of the surface projected in a plane perpendicular to the field. Gauss's Law is a general law applying to any closed surface. It is an important tool since it permits the assessment of the amount of enclosed charge by mapping the field on a surface outside the charge distribution. For geometries of sufficient symmetry, it simplifies the calculation of the electric field.
    Another way of visualizing this is to consider a probe of area A which can measure the electric field perpendicular to that area. If it picks any closed surface and steps over that surface, measuring the perpendicular field times its area, it will obtain a measure of the net electric charge within the surface, no matter how that internal charge is configured.



    Gauss' Law, Integral Form







    The area integral of the electric field over any closed surface is equal to the net charge enclosed in the surface divided by the permittivity of space. Gauss' law is a form of one of Maxwell's equations, the four fundamental equations for electricity and magnetism. gaulaw2 - Fsc 2nd Year chapter No :1 | ELECTROSTATICS Gauss' law permits the evaluation of the electric field in many practical situations by forming a symmetric Gaussian surface surrounding a charge distribution and evaluating the electric flux through that surface.

    The concept of electric flux is useful in association with Gauss' law. The electric flux through a planar area is defined as the electric field times the component of the area perpendicular to the field. If the area is not planar, then the evaluation of the flux generally requires an area integral since the angle will be continually changing.
    eflux - Fsc 2nd Year chapter No :1 | ELECTROSTATICS eflux2 - Fsc 2nd Year chapter No :1 | ELECTROSTATICS When the area A is used in a vector operation like this, it is understood that the magnitude of the vector is equal to the area and the direction of the vector is perpendicular to the area.








 

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